Where We Work

Grizzly bears are listed as “threatened” in the continental United States by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Today, grizzly bear distribution is primarily within but not limited to the areas identified as “Recovery Ecosystems.”

 

NEW! Vist Return of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear to learn how a population of grizzly bears have come back from edge of extinction.

 

IGBC Overview

The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC) was formed in 1983 to help ensure recovery of viable grizzly bear populations and their habitat in the lower 48 states through interagency coordination of policy, planning, management, and research.

The IGBC consists of representatives from the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Geological Survey and representatives of the state wildlife agencies of Idaho, Montana, Washington and Wyoming. In the interest of international coordination and cooperation, the Canadian Wildlife Service is also represented. At the ecosystem level Native American tribes possessing grizzly habitat within the recovery areas have also been involved.

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BEAR-RESISTANT
PRODUCTS

Whether you’re camping, hunting or living in bear habitat, you can keep bears from becoming food-conditioned by protecting your food and garbage. IGBC–certified products have passed a testing protocol, often using a captive grizzly bear!

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BEAR SAFETY

While seeing a bear is a memorable experience, your safety and the survival of bears depends on you keeping your distance! Before you head into bear habitat, take time to learn about bears and how best to avoid them.

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ALL ABOUT GRIZZLIES

Grizzlies are different than black bears and you can learn to recognize them through their appearance, behavior and habitat.

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CONSERVING
GRIZZLY POPULATIONS

Grizzly bears once thrived in most of the western U.S, but now they are only found in subpopulations in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and Washington states. Today, their whereabouts and numbers are closely monitored.

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